Story in Game Design (2/2)

This is part 2. Part 1 is about story in video games in general. I have split this post in two, but could have just as easily filled the pages of a book. Incidentally, there are already many excellent books about storytelling out there. Part 2 focuses on the story in Torgar’s Quest.

Story in Torgar’s Quest

Basically, Torgar’s Quest is about a dwarf running through a dungeon, killing and destroying things along the way, while looking for treasure. That is where I started, and while the game mechanics were fun, the game needed story to better tie the elements together.

Some background and motivation for the game’s main character seemed like a good place to start. In this case, a reason for Torgar Splitbeard to be in the dungeon, and a goal the player can help him achieve.

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Early on, I had decided that to win the game, you would need to find and collect 7 crystals. It was an easy jump from there, to say that these were actually shards that together form a powerful artifact – The Mastery Crystal, which Torgar of course is seeking to find. Brainstorming is your friend when developing story, and much of what came next was a product of exploring this initial idea.

Seeking to boost Torgar’s motivation, I decided that he was the underdog of his clan, a younger prince with no hope of inheriting power, and everyone in his family saw him as weak, and incapable of achieving greatness. Here I had my first glimpse of Torgar’s personality: clearly upset, with a strong need to prove himself to his clan, and more so, to become powerful in his own right.

Whenever I am stuck in developing a story, I start asking questions. Why is this character interested in X? How did Y learn about Z? What if something unexpected happened? By asking questions, I soon had a tie-in between the crystal artifact and Torgar’s own story.

Why was the artifact split into shards? What if the Mastery Crystal was too powerful, and hunting for it could corrupt Torgar’s very soul? I liked that, so in the game, the longer you take to find the seven shards, the more twisted Torgar becomes.

I also started wondering about the dungeon itself, and decided it had once been the home of Torgar’s clan, but that the dwarves had been driven out during an invasion of monsters many years ago. This adds to Torgar’s resolve: he is not only seeking a magical crystal, he is also taking back his clan’s old home. Tying story strings together is never a bad thing.

I included bits of lore to spice up the Deepgold Mines, which can be found in hidden tomes around the dungeon. These books of lore serve no other purpose than to add flavor, a dash of humor and to make the game more fun. But if you’re the kind of person who tends to skip the flavor text, you can simply ignore it and play the game with no penalty – an important detail, because I definitely did not want to force players to stop and read, if all they want is to bash monsters (Diablo handles this by using a voice over that plays in the background, but that was a little out of my budget).

No matter the size and budget of your game, carefully consider its story and how you can get the most out of it. I strongly recommend reading up on story structure and narrative methods. Coming from a game-perspective, also read about how stories are told and characters are developed in film and novels, which will help you find and develop your own universes full of exciting stories. You may also enjoy reading about storytelling in marketing, and learn more about stirring emotion and excitement in the people who play your game.

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