Game in a Day: Procformer Infinite

Procformer Infinite
I like to set challenges for myself. Self-imposed, often timed challenges is a great way to learn new things, or experiment with different ideas. I find that it’s a great way to learn new concepts or test theories you might have; set yourself a challenge, and try to overcome it.

So, on a lazy Sunday, instead of playing video games, I challenged myself to make a platform game myself. Right away, I knew I wanted it to have an infinite number of procedurally generated levels, so you could never run out of new challenges. To make it more difficult for myself, I was not allowed to use any third party artwork or sound, everything had to be made for this challenge (no using scraps from the personal archives), and to top it off, I only allowed myself one day to complete it.That was pretty much my entire Sunday, but worth every second of it.

The screenshot is from the resulting game – Procformer Infinite – which you can play yourself, right here!

Challenge completed. Next! Perhaps improving or expanding the game with more features and obstacles? You never know what might happen on any given Sunday.

Introducing Torgar’s Quest (roguelike)

Torgar's Quest (alpha)For several months now, I have been working on a 2D village building game, Founder, using the Gamesalad engine. Since Gamesalad runs on Mac and mine started randomly rebooting several times a day, I could no longer reliably work on my village builder.

Bummer. Doubly so because I have limited time, so a trip to the Apple Store will have to wait until after the holidays.

They say you should make lemonade, when Life gives you lemons, so I fired up my PC instead, and GameMaker Studio, which I have been using more and more anyway, and started a project I had wanted to try for a long time: building a roguelike dungeon crawler.

Thus Torgar’s Quest was born!

For those not in the know, a roguelike is a turn-based game inspired by the classic game, Rogue, in which you run around fighting things on a randomly generated map. Oh yeah, and there’s no saving the game, so if you die, you have to start over. Read more about roguelikes elsewhere (I will be following up with a post on how I went about it later).

I was initially thinking of this project as an exercise in coding the procedural level generation, just a bit of fun while I wait to get my Mac fixed. But as it sometimes happens, the side project took on a life of its own, and I let it, because I love roguelikes.

Within a few days, and with the use of a fantastic, free tileset, I had a working alpha build. From here, it’s a matter of tweaking the balance, adding a few more features and audio. It’s still a work-in-progress, but I am going to keep Torgar’s Quest pretty small.

Right now, a playthrough takes just a few minutes to play, unless you get really lucky or play better than usual (read: me), and that is pretty much perfect for what I am looking for.

Eventually, the finished game will be available for sale, but while it’s still in alpha, it is absolutely free to download and play (at the time of writing, it’s Windows only). The game even has its own website, where you can play a web-based version as well.

Presenting: Alien Attack Armada

Alien Attack Armada

Play Alien Attack Armada (opens in a pop up window)

This was written after 22 straight hours of gaming and/or developing Alien Attack Armada, as part of my participation in this year’s Extra Life event. I made this game from scratch during the event, right down to the sound effects and, um, artwork.

A huge thank you to everyone who donated, watched my Twitch feed, on Twitter, or provided support and encouragement elsewhere along the way. More detail will undoubtedly follow later. For now, I still have 2 more hours left of Extra Life…